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FREW Consultants Group        
Monday, December 16 2019

Another Year Over

The focus of our work is to help teachers and schools deal with students who disrupt lessons.  For as long as I can remember this has always been the number one issue identified in surveys about teacher concerns.  However, recently the unreasonable non-educational work load placed on teachers has become equally stressful.  This doesn’t mean the problem of students with dysfunctional behaviour is no longer a problem, it is just that the increased work load has added to the pressure felt by teachers.

It would be fair to say that there is little acknowledgement of the problem created by these students despite the overwhelming evidence that their presence has a significant effect on the teacher’s ability to deliver quality lessons and the classmates of these children ability to learn. 

Addressing this problem is at the heart of all our work and to date we have provided over 100 Newsletters that point out the causes of these poor behaviours and describe techniques to help, not only the teacher’s ability to manage the classroom but also assist these students develop new ways to get their needs met.

Recently, the latest PISA results were released and like clock-work the politicians and shock jocks were on the band wagon criticising teachers and pontificating their solution to this ‘failing’ – predictably BACK TO BASICS!  I have always been critical of this test and our local NAPLAN equivalent.  There are lots of reasons these tests are flawed.  NAPLAN, for instance is supposed to be a ‘snap shot’ look at the student’s progress without any special preparation.  Anyone who thinks those conditions hold today is naïve.  Some schools spend much of their time preparing for the test and concerned parents send their children to ‘special’ tutoring to ensure they ‘pass’.  There are many other ways to manipulate these figures.

However, Trevor Cobbold, the National Convenor of Save our Schools has examined the latest findings by the OECD about the results and I will quote extensively from his analysis of the apparent failing of our kids.  It is evident our students do not try in the test because they have become disenchanted with our school system!  Trevor highlights three main causes.

“First, the high and differing proportions of students not fully trying across countries has explosive implications for the reliability of international comparisons based on PISA and that country rankings cannot be trusted. A research study by the US National Bureau of Economic Research last year shows that even with modest but differing proportions of students between countries not fully trying can cause large changes in PISA rankings. 

Second, other new data released by the OECD shows a large increase between 2003 and 2018 in the proportion of students in Australia who are dissatisfied with school. This may have led to increasing proportions not fully trying and therefore may be a factor behind Australia’s declining results. 

 Third, high proportions of students not trying on PISA may also explain, at least in part, the contradiction between Australia’s declining PISA results (for mostly Year 10 students) and improving Year 12 results. PISA has no consequences for students – they don’t even get their own results – so many might not be bothered to fully try. In contrast, Year 12 results matter for future careers and life changes so there is a greater incentive to try hard. The significant improvements in Year 12 results are an indication of an improving education system, not a deteriorating one”.

This increase in Year 12 is encouraging but for our students it is meaningless because by the time they reach 17 years old, if not before poorly behaving students are out of the system.  However, it does recognise that teachers are doing their job and instead of being criticised they should be supported to deal with the problems in the lower Years where these behaviour problems exist.

As I pointed out above, dealing with students with severe behaviours is at the heart of our work.  It would be encouraging if Universities really dealt with this issue and prepared their trainee teachers in techniques to deal with dysfunctional behaviour.  Looking through the courses offered by Universities and talking with new graduates it is evident that they are ill-prepared to take on a tough class.

As 2019 comes to an end it’s time to reflect on the year that was.  From our position the year had mixed results.  The amount of work we have done in schools and elsewhere has slowly increased and we have plans to build-up that support in 2020.  As mentioned the number of Newsletters has passed the 100 mark and I have completed my next book, ‘Teaching Very Difficult Kids’ and it has been picked up by an international publishing company based in London and New York thus providing us with another way to provide support.  

Since ‘retirement’ we are one step more displaced from the work place and so not as aware of emerging issues.  We would encourage you to let us know what you think of our efforts and provide us with specific problems we can address.  You can contact us through the web page, send a text or ring.

Finally, this is the last of the Newsletters for 2019, another year over.  Marcia and I would like to thank you for not only hanging in with those difficult students who really deserved to be helped and for supporting us.  It is the hardest of work sometimes but I know and you should know you can make a life altering transformation for some kids.  You may never know but I assure you that if you approach these kids with respect and a clear purpose you will be the difference.

Take time to relax, recharge your batteries and get ready for another challenging year.

Posted by: AT 10:14 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
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PRINCIPALS

John R Frew
Marcia J Vallance


ABN 64 372 518 772

ABOUT

The principals of the company have had long careers in education with a combined total of eighty-one years service.  After starting as mainstream teachers they both moved into careers in providing support for students with severe behaviours.

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